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"Rapiscan Secure 1000 FAQ's"


Frequently Asked Questions
 
Q: What is the SECURE 1000 Scanner?

Q: What can the SECURE 1000 detect?

Q: How are persons scanned?

Q: What is the operating principle of the SECURE 1000?

Q: How much radiant energy is a person exposed to?

Q: Is background radiation exposure really a good comparison?

Q: What about exposure levels for individuals who are frequent flyers or for employees in companies or high security facilities who have to be screened each day?

Q: Will SECURE 1000 detect objects in the body?

Q: How does the system compare to a metal detector?

Q: Can the SECURE 1000 images be saved?

Q: Does the SECURE 1000 work on baggage?

Q: What if a person refuses to be scanned by the SECURE 1000?

Q: Has independent testing verified the performance of the SECURE 1000?

Q: Has the FDA cleared the product?

Q: Is the technology for SECURE 1000 proprietary?

Q: If there is a mechanical or electronic failure, can the system expose people to excessive radiation?

Q: How long does it take to install a system and train the operators?

Q: What are the operating conditions for SECURE 1000?

Q: How reliable is the SECURE 1000?

Q: What about routine maintenance?

 

 

Q: What is the SECURE 1000 Scanner?

A: The SECURE 1000 is a nonintrusive personnel screening system designed to detect metallic and nonmetallic objects concealed under a person's clothing. The turnkey system offers numerous advantages over metal detectors and "pat down" searches for personnel screening in correctional facilities for visitors and inmates, asset protection in industrial facilities such as precious metals and computer component companies and high security installations such as nuclear facilities, embassies and border crossing check-points.

 

Q: What can the SECURE 1000 detect?

A: The SECURE 1000 can simultaneously locate and detect conventional metal weapons, high-tech plastic and ceramic firearms, explosives, illegal drugs, precious metals, cameras, recording devices and other contraband or security threats.

 

Q: How are persons scanned?

A: A person faces the SECURE 1000 and a front scan is generated. The person turns around and a rear scan is generated. Within seconds, a computer-aided image of the subject appears on the monitor revealing any objects concealed under or within the subjects clothing.

 

Q: What is the operating principle of the SECURE 1000?

A: A narrow, low energy x-ray beam is scanned over the body surface. The reflection or backscatter of the beam is detected, digitized and computer stored. The data is then enhanced, using state-of-the-art imaging techniques to create a display of the person and any concealed objects.

 

Q: How much radiant energy is a person exposed to?

A: Each full body scan of the SECURE 1000 produces approximately 3 microREMs of emission. This is equivalent to the exposure every person receives each five minutes from naturally occurring background environmental radioactivity.

 

Q: Is background radiation exposure really a good comparison?

A: Yes, because SECURE 1000 scanning and background radiation both expose a large portion of the body to a very low level of x-rays. The only difference is that background radiation has slightly higher x-ray energy resulting in deeper penetration.

 

Q: What about exposure levels for individuals who are frequent flyers or for employees in companies or high security facilities who have to be screened each day?

A: Under current international guidelines (such as the ANSI 43.17 Standard) up to 5000 scans per year can be conducted safely.

 

Q: Will SECURE 1000 detect objects in the body?

A: No, the x-rays penetrate only about 1/10 (0.1) inch of the skin. Any object that would be deeper than that level would not be detected. Under current regulations generally body cavity inspections must be performed by high dose medical x-ray systems in the presence of a medical professional or body cavity searches must be performed manually by trained enforcement personnel.

 

Q: How does the system compare to a metal detector?

A: The SECURE 1000 is superior to metal detectors in three significant ways. First, nonmetallic objects can be detected. Second, the size, shape, and location of the offending object is clearly shown. Third, the system can detect much smaller amounts of metal as well as different forms of metal including solids, powders, and liquid slurries.

 

Q: Can the SECURE 1000 images be saved?

A: The images acquired with the system can be saved on the system's hard disk or transferred to floppy disk for training and legal documentation. The stored images can be recalled and viewed on the system monitor or on any IBM compatible personal computer with color graphics.

 

Q: Does the SECURE 1000 work on baggage?

A: No, the system is designed and optimized for low dose operation, which is not needed or intended for baggage screening.

 

Q: What if a person refuses to be scanned by the SECURE 1000?

A: Persons reluctant to be scanned can be offered the alternative of being hand searched by a security officer. When given the option, most people would rather be scanned.

 

Q: Has independent testing verified the performance of the SECURE 1000?

A: Yes, Sandia National Laboratories has evaluated the SECURE 1000. The Sandia report concluded that "the SECURE 1000 does have the applicability to detection of contraband materials" such as explosives, illegal chemicals, weapons, and special nuclear material containers, based on its test results. "In terms of safety, there appears to be no danger of radiation exposure due to a mechanical malfunction". In addition, the radiation exposure during normal operation of the SECURE 1000 was determined to be less than 10 microREM per scan, which is well below the allowable yearly dose of 100 milliREM (equivalent to 32,000 scans by the SECURE 1000).

 

Q: Has the FDA cleared the product?

A: Yes, after a thorough review of performance and safety data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a statement clearing the SECURE 1000 for sale into interstate commerce.

 

Q: Is the technology for SECURE 1000 proprietary?

A: In January, 1993, a patent was issued for the backscatter detection system to be used by the SECURE 1000. The significance of this patent is the recognition of the major advancement in technology that permits the safe and effective use of reflected energy to screen for concealed objects on a person's body.

 

Q: If there is a mechanical or electronic failure, can the system expose people to excessive radiation?

A: No, there are two backup safety systems that continually monitor the scanner during each scan. Sandia National Laboratories and the FDA have thoroughly reviewed these and other safety features of the system.

 

Q: How long does it take to install a system and train the operators?

A: Installation is simple, SECURE 1000 just plugs into a standard outlet (110 V or 220 V, 50/60 Hz, 10 Amp) and is immediately ready. No special shielding or calibration is required. Security officers are ready to use the system after only a few hours of training.

 

Q: What are the operating conditions for SECURE 1000?

A: The SECURE 1000 is designed to operate from 0 to 40C (32 to 104F) and is only limited by the specification of electronic subsystems such as the monitor, power supplies, hard disk, etc. It can also operate in high humidity environments as long as condensation does not occur on internal components.

 

Q: How reliable is the SECURE 1000?

A: In designing the SECURE 1000 scanner, subsystems and components were specified with major emphasis on reliability. The system has a projected lifetime well in excess of one million scans over a period of five-to-ten years, dependent upon usage characteristics of the customer.

 

Q: What about routine maintenance?

A: The SECURE 1000 has been designed to operate reliably with only minimal, required periodic maintenance. Rapiscan recommends that the user conduct a brief inspection of the system approximately every 10,000 scans (or every three months - whichever comes first) to maximize reliability. The rear doors of the scanner should be opened and the system should be examined for loose or damaged components, Mechanical parts should be lubricated, and then the system should be recalibrated (if necessary) using the automated calibration procedure.

 


View Secure 1000 Press Releases

View the Secure 1000 Safety Information Page

 

Price: Available Upon Request


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